A330 was the first ETOPS-240 approved aircraft

July, 26, 2021 by Kyle Boas

The FAA ruled in 2007 that US-registered twin-engined airplane operators can fly more than 180-minute ETOPS to the design limit of the aircraft. In November 2009, the A330 was the first airplane to get the ETOPS-240 approval. From Airbus:

The new capability will be available as a customer-selectable option which extends the diversion distance potentially up to 1,700 nm. This distance corresponds to a maximum ETOPS diversion time for the A330 of approximately 240 minutes (at one-engine-inoperative speed under standard conditions).

Here is the difference between an ETOPS-enabled shorter flight path (the solid green line) and a flight path for non-ETOPS aeroplane (the dashed blue line).

References: Airbus, Vladsinger

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

IFATC Stats: 17-23 Jul 2021

July, 25, 2021 by Kyle Boas

The region assignment program allows for new controllers to select one of ten global regions around the world, control any airport within that regional boundary at any time, and remain within their area of operation on a more permanent basis. Read more about the change here.


Awesome work from the following 20 controllers for being the most active out of our entire team in the past 90 days.

Controller Days Active
Edoardo_C 97%
Drummer 96%
Anthony_Morgan 96%
Siddhansh 96%
NJ24 96%
Kyle0705 94%
Vignesh_S 94%
Neto_Campelo 94%
LordWizrak 94%
I_AM_KOREAN_FOX 89%
ShaneAviation 87%
Alexandre 84%
Enrique_Fernandez 82%
Eason_F 81%
JulietTango 81%
Rob_M 77%
CR3W 77%
ThomasThePro 77%
Jakub_Astary 73%
Kedz 71%

If you are interested in becoming an IFATC controller submit an application to get started!


Here is the author leaderboard for this week, this is how many posts you submitted to be published within the week.

Author Posts
Kyle Boas 3
Suhas 1
Muhammad A. 1

Thank you for helping add to the post queue! If you are an IFATC member and you would like to become a writer, join here!

Analytics

Here is a comparison between this week and last week website analytics.

Goals

We will be sharing our current follower or membership count and a lofty goal we’d like to reach, so you can watch us grow every week.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Reminder that speed instructions are in IAS

July, 24, 2021 by Kyle Boas

Speed instructions from all controllers are sent in indicated airspeed (IAS) not ground speed (GS). Here is an excerpt from the ATC Manual.

6.14.1 – There is a common misconception between the relationship between Indicated Airspeed (IAS) and Groundspeed (GS). For simplicity the reasons behind the difference are not covered, however there are two things that will ultimately affect the relationship: wind and altitude!

6.14.2 – Wind: if there is a tailwind of 20kts, that means there is 20kts of wind pushing the aircraft along in addition to its normal speed, so 180kts IAS will become 200kts GS. Similarly, if there is 20kts of headwind, that means there is 20kts of wind pushing against the aircraft, so 180kts IAS becomes 160kts GS.

6.14.3 – Altitude: as the altitude of aircraft increases, so will the difference between IAS and GS. Below are some very ‘ball-park’ figures which can be used for reference. With the aircraft flying at 250kts IAS with no wind:

3000ft 260kts GS (+10)

6000ft 270kts GS (+20)

9000ft 290kts GS (+40)

12000ft 300kts GS (+50)

Controllers can still view an aircraft’s GS, IAS and Mach Speed in the pilot’s information and on the radar.

References: 6.14 of the Infinite Flight ATC Manual

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

The seven sections of an ATIS broadcast

July, 23, 2021 by Kyle Boas

There are seven sections of an ATIS broadcast, and it helps to be able to distinguish between the different portions. This broadcast will be our example, from an ATIS published at Arturo Merino (SCEL):

Arturo Merino airport, ATIS information CHARLIE, time 0635 ZULU, Wind 140 at 4 Visibility 21, Temperature 16, Dew Point 6, QNH 1012. Remarks, use of Departure and Arrival procedures recommended. Landing Runway 17L and 17R, Departing Runway 17L and 17R. Recommended Arrival Procedures, ASIM5D, EROL5F, UMKA5C. Notams, aircraft size restrictions in effect. Advise on initial contact, you have information CHARLIE.

Now we’ll break down this broadcast into seven sections:

Section 1: Arturo Merino airport, ATIS information CHARLIE, time 0635 ZULU

The first section is very basic. It provides the airport name, the ATIS information alphanumeric letter associated with the information, and the time of when this ATIS was published.

Section 2: Wind 140 at 4 Visibility 21, Temperature 16, Dew Point 6, QNH 1012.

The next section is the weather information. The wind direction (wind is blowing at 4knts at a heading of 140), visibility (21sm), and the temperature is in degrees Celsius (as it is the international standard). The dew point and QNH are not applicable in Infinite Flight at this time. QNH is a pressure setting you dial into your altimeter to produce the height above sea level, and there is no altimeter in Infinite Flight.

Section 3: Remarks, use of Departure and Arrival procedures recommended.

This section, known as the remarks section, is important to follow to avoid violations. The remarks are handpicked by the controller staffing the airport, and these must be followed.

In this case, the controller is recommending the pilots to apply SIDs/STARs to their flight plan, but not requiring them to do so. In the case that there are no remarks, this section will not appear in an ATIS.

You can read more about Remarks in section 4.2 of the ATC Manual.

Section 4: Landing Runway 17L and 17R, Departing Runway 17L and 17R.

Runways in use are displayed here. These must be always followed, unless
otherwise instructed by ATC.

Section 5: Recommended Arrival Procedures, ASIM5D, EROL5F, UMKA5C.

This section states which SIDs and/or STARs are currently in effect, chosen by the controllers staffing the airport. Make sure to apply them to your flight plan before contacting ATC.

Section 6: Notams, aircraft size restrictions in effect.

There are three NOTAMs which ATC can select depending on the conditions:

  • Event in progress, expect delays
  • aircraft size restrictions in effect
  • low visibility, use caution

You can read more about NOTAMS in section 4.2 of the ATC Manual.

Section 7: Advise on initial contact, you have information CHARLIE.

The final section of the ATIS broadcast just repeats the current information alphanumeric letter. Once you tune in to the ATIS frequency, the system will automatically take that and add “information Charlie” to your future ATC messages. For example, if you were to request pushback it would say “N623KB, ready for pushback with information Charlie”.

Once you are able distinguish between those sections you may find it easier to comprehend the information and it may make it easier for you to anticipate when specific information will be said when you read the ATIS.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Rolling at London Heathrow

July, 22, 2021 by Suhas

Busy session at London Heathrow on the Expert Server, with Ground, Tower, ATIS, and Approach controllers working together to ensure a seamless service.

Suhas is a writer for the IFATC Education Group. He is a long time Infinite Flight user and IFATC Specialist. In the real world, he’s a student pilot on both glider and powered aircraft. He's also an IFVARB Board Member.

LGAV’s first day with 3D airport objects

July, 21, 2021 by Kyle Boas

Hello everyone, it’s Yazen. Here’s an amazing time-lapse of a busy session at newly 3D (at the time) Athens Eleftherios Venizelos Airport. I was the local controller with ground, tower and the ATIS. While Georgios was doing a phenomenal job as the radar controller.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Never make fun of someone who mispronounces a word

July, 20, 2021 by Kyle Boas

“Never make fun of someone who mispronounces a word. It means they learned it by reading.” — AJ Styles

Think of where you were when you started whenever you see someone who is struggling.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

How to Plan for your IFATC Radar Training Sessions

July, 19, 2021 by Suhas

For those who decide to pursue radar training in IFATC to become an IFATC Officer, extensive training is required. So how do you make sure you pass?

Once you’ve been given your next training airport, you want to familiarize yourself with the field as much as you can. What things should be taken into account? Terrain, altitudes, headings, and other strategies are essential items to be pinpointed before a radar session. To start, head to ifatc.org and enter your airport code to find a map with terrain, MSA (Minimum Safe Altitudes), and more. If you experiment with the ‘Explore’ tab, you can show options such as Waypoints, nearby airfields, and Approach/Glideslope details, which are very helpful in planning. Start off with writing the MSAs for different areas, based on terrain. Next, mark down your pattern altitudes/headings, as well as your inbound altitudes and paths. Ask your trainer questions, run your plan by them, look at charts/MSAs, watch videos of the approach online if applicable, and fly your plan! Fly your planned routes/altitudes as if you were a pilot at your session – take note of specific waypoints or areas to turn aircraft or safely vector them around terrain. A good tip is that if you see an airport near your session airport and it is in a challenging location or you hope nobody is placed there, spawn there and fly it. Prepare for the worst so that you can’t have anything unexpected happen. Use your resources!

By the time your session rolls around, stick to your plan, think logically, be proactive, and you can’t go wrong. If you do, there’s no shame whatsoever – that is the purpose of training. Failure is the recipe for success.

Suhas is a writer for the IFATC Education Group. He is a long time Infinite Flight user and IFATC Specialist. In the real world, he’s a student pilot on both glider and powered aircraft. He's also an IFVARB Board Member.

IFATC Stats: 10-16 Jul 2021

July, 18, 2021 by Kyle Boas

The region assignment program allows for new controllers to select one of ten global regions around the world, control any airport within that regional boundary at any time, and remain within their area of operation on a more permanent basis. Read more about the change here.


Awesome work from the following 20 controllers for being the most active out of our entire team in the past 90 days.

Controller Days Active
Edoardo_C 96%
NJ24 94%
Kyle0705 93%
Siddhansh 93%
Anthony_Morgan 93%
Neto_Campelo 92%
LordWizrak 92%
Drummer 92%
Vignesh_S 92%
I_AM_KOREAN_FOX 88%
Alexandre 87%
ShaneAviation 86%
Enrique_Fernandez 83%
JulietTango 81%
Eason_F 78%
CR3W 76%
Rob_M 76%
ThomasThePro 74%
xvalespx 73%
Jakub_Astary 73%

If you are interested in becoming an IFATC controller submit an application to get started!


Here is the author leaderboard for this week, this is how many posts you submitted to be published within the week.

Author Posts
Kyle Boas 3
Suhas 1
Sebastien Ollquist-Cartier 1

Thank you for helping add to the post queue! If you are an IFATC member and you would like to become a writer, join here!

Analytics

Here is a comparison between this week and last week website analytics.

Goals

We will be sharing our current follower or membership count and a lofty goal we’d like to reach, so you can watch us grow every week.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

The importance of communication in IFATC

July, 17, 2021 by Kyle Boas

I often see two or three controllers that take over frequencies over the same region or same airport but do not communicate with each other, or worse, do not even know such frequencies are open. In my previous post, I already mentionned communication. I thought I should, and could write a little more about this in particular to emphasize the importance of communication for a successful controlling session, hence my post today.

Stay active in discord for as long as you control

Unless it is not possible for you (i.e. single device), try and keep discord open in another window in order to monitor the chat when you are actively controlling. This helps managing traffic in a more efficient manner which is one of the main goals we have as IFATC. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of communication, especially between controllers of “neighbour” frequencies, that is, Ground-Tower, Tower-Approach or Approach-Center.

Voice Chat whenever possible

If you can, head into VC. It is much more enjoyable to hear other voices and again, much more efficient. When traffic is heavy, controlling one or two frequencies and managing the discord chat at the same time can become overwhelming. This is when VC comes in handy. Additionally, we get to speak with people from all around the world and get to know them better. We are a team, and a voice chat is one of the best ways to get together.

The more traffic, the higher the importance of communication

Once again, when traffic is high, communication becomes a must. We almost all like controlling for Friday Night Flights, flash flights or other main events. However, during those times, lack of communication can result in multiple inefficiencies that lead to congested airspaces and an unorganised controlling session. Trust me, when traffic is heavy, you don’t want this to happen so keep communicating with your peers and ensure a good service to pilots exactly like what is done in real life, you won’t regret it.

Special airports

As a last point, notice that there exists some airports that have special procedures. For instance, mountains on only one side of the airport can result in aircraft taking off from one end of the runway but must land on the other end. In these kind of scenarios, communication between tower and approach is key. This avoids creating unnecessary go arounds or close calls.

Overall, remember that as long as you plan your session, concentrate and of course communicate, your controlling sessions will be the best you ever have.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More