Practicing on your own

November, 27, 2021 by Kyle Boas

You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink.

You can train with your trainer, fly with a flight instructor, ect. but if you don’t put in the work and meet your teacher half way, then you’ll never reach your ultimate goal of succeeding.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Always accept help

November, 26, 2021 by Kyle Boas

It always feels good to be the man, to be the one who was able to control everything by themselves. No help. Had it under control no problem, they get all the congratulations. That’s not how controlling works.

Controlling is not tennis, it’s a team sport. You work as a team to provide the best service possible. If someone says that they’d like to help, let them help.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Leadership and Learning

November, 25, 2021 by Kyle Boas

“Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.” – John F. Kennedy

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Mixture Control: Explained

November, 23, 2021 by Matei G.

You may have spawned in the C172 or in another general aviation aircraft and saw this weird red lever which you can pull or push. You may have also realized that if you pull it all the way, the engines stop running, I am going to try to explain you this function.

Mixture control, to keep it simple, controls the ratio (mix) of the weight of the fuel and the wight of  air that is going to be burned. When you move the knob, a little bar is going to block the fuel or the air flow. (See image below)

This is used at higher altitudes where the air pressure is low therefore, you have to move the knob so there is more air flow and less fuel flow.

Here is an image that briefly shows this function:

 

 

I hope that you now know what mixture is and does.

Matei G. is a writer for the IFATC Education Grouo. He is in multiple VAs, he’s an aviation passionate, he likes helping people out in the whole Infinite Flight Community. He’s grade 3, soon to be 4. He has a lot of things to talk about and likes pancakes!

Discord Bot Feed Issues Update

November, 21, 2021 by Kyle Boas

If you’ve installed our Discord bot in your server you may be aware that we have been experiencing issues that is stopping us from delivering our blog posts via our bot.

This is kind of a good problem to have in a way but we believe the issue is that our bot is in too many servers. For that reason the bot is being rate limited by Discord. The bot remains operational for the other functions we offer, but the feed is not working. It either sporadically sends posts or sends none at all.

As we continue to try to work on that issue on our end, we are currently also in contact with Discord Support to fix this issue and are patiently waiting for a response.

In the meantime, if you are one of the many server owners who have our bot installed we’d encourage you to share this post with your server members so they don’t miss our posts.

Yes, we still have continued to post daily. 864 quality posts and counting from the wide variety of IFATC controllers on our writing team.

The method we’d recommend for others to use to receive our posts would be to subscribe to our email newsletter. You can also follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

We’ll post another update once we have fixed the issue and the bot becomes fully operational again.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Less Frustration, More Teaching

November, 20, 2021 by Editors

Instead of getting frustrated with pilots, let’s take a different approach.

For us IFATC controllers, we expect proper use of instructions and commands at all times. However, we do not always get this because it’s not an expectation that can be met. Mistakes can happen, people can misunderstand commands. As IFATC controllers, I think we should take a different approach to handling the mistakes pilots make.

Instead of getting frustrated, we should teach the pilots the correct ways. We can do this by reaching out to the pilots on the community forum and addressing the issue and then teaching them how to correct the issue.

If the pilot or controller has their username visible in-app, that is the same username you’d use to contact them on the forum.

This not only will benefit the pilot, but it will also benefit the controllers because in future sessions there will be one less pilot who does not know the correct way to communicate with ATC. And that compounds because they tell their friends, then those friends tell theirs.

Those pilots may become regulars you see all the time, and they’d know they have an open line of communication to ask questions.

Receiving feedback the right way

November, 19, 2021 by Kyle Boas

Always take feedback in, don’t reject it or project your disappointment onto the person giving you the feedback.

The best controllers and pilots didn’t get to where they are without some self reflection. You won’t get anywhere if you are never receptive to bad or good news.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

When to request descent via STAR

November, 18, 2021 by AviationChampion

You’re on a flight from Los Angeles on your way to San Francisco, and Center opens for the Oakland FIR. How should you know when to request descent via STAR?

First things first, STAR is an abbreviation for Standard Terminal Arrival Route. As for the departure side of things, this is what’s known as “SID’s”. This abbreviation is short for Standard Instrument Departure. When someone is planning a flight, it’s very likely to see a SID and STAR on their route.

Now that you’ve read the definitions of those two abbreviations, it’s time to discuss the descent part of your route. According to the Flying Guide | Pilot to Radar Controller Communication Table, a pilot should only request descent via STAR when they are within 1 minute of their top of descent.

If you’re not good at calculating the top of descent, a very useful strategy according to Calculating Top of Descent – Flying Magazine, “A quick and easy way to figure it out is to start with your altitude above field elevation and multiply that number by three. This will give you the approximate distance in nautical miles from the airport to start a 500-foot-per-minute descent in the typical light general aviation airplane and reach pattern altitude.”

Thanks for reading! Stay tuned for more!

AviationChampion is a writer for the IFATC Education Group. He lives in the United States currently residing in Ohio. He loves to control busy airports in his free time and work on things to keep himself busy. His favorite things to do include dirt biking, ATV riding, going to the beach, spotting airplanes at his local airport (KCMH), zip-lining and flying on Infinite Flight.

Transonic

November, 16, 2021 by Kyle Boas

This is a VFA-106 Gladiators F/A-18.

Photo credit to Camden Thrasher

This aircraft is transonic, not supersonic, which you can tell by the angle/location of the shocks. At transonic speeds the aircraft is not moving through the air faster than sound, but airflow has to locally exceed the speed of sound to navigate around parts of the aircraft like the wings (especially the tops), control surfaces, and other protrusions.

An aircraft in fully supersonic flight will typically have large shocks at the nose and tail (causing the double boom often heard) as well as a number of minor shocks caused by different parts of the shape, especially where the cross-sectional area changes.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Finding the time to practice

November, 15, 2021 by Kyle Boas

We all get to a level eventually where we think, we’re too good for that. I don’t need to practice. I don’t need to train. I don’t need a reminder.

Then you fly or open a frequency, and your performance is half of what it could have been. Why? You procrastinated and didn’t put in the time beforehand.

Setting aside time to refine is the most important step to become great. You can’t achieve perfection if your prep work is mediocre or non existent.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More