AMA with Evan L.

January, 7, 2021 by ,
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Right now we will be having an AMA “Ask Me Anything with Evan L., a commercial single-engine and multi-engine rated pilot, as well as certificated single-engine, multi-engine, and instrument flight instructor. Here is a message from Evan:

My name is Evan, I’m a 25 year old commercial pilot and flight instructor based in Denver with around 600 hours of flight time. I hold a bachelor’s degree in environmental science and completed my pilot training in the Phoenix area, going from zero experience to being a multi-engine commercial pilot as well as holding all 3 instructor ratings within the span of about 11 months.

Flight simulators are the reason I became what I am today, and I want to be a part in helping other young people realize the tools available to them to potentially realize a dream they had never considered before.

I started this career with the goal of becoming an airline pilot, but through my aviation journey thus far I am now fully pursuing opportunities in the corporate aviation world. Ask me anything about college, flight training, IFR (my favorite!), and come fly with me as UVAL 465.

You can ask a question right now, he’ll be around to answer your questions throughout the day. Leave your questions in the comments below!

Ask a question

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More
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Fung Sum Sum
1 year ago

What is your best moment of doing an IFATC?

Evan L
1 year ago
Reply to  Fung Sum Sum

I’ve actually only tried controlling a couple times without much success, but I would like to get more into it in the future. I’ve always been interested in learning more about ATC operations.

Gregory Moore
1 year ago

What was the most people you had to report in 1 session? Where was it at? When Was it? how many people did you report? How long did the session last?

Furwani
1 year ago

Are you human

Evan L
1 year ago
Reply to  Furwani

Great question Furwani! That is actually harder to answer than you may think. I’d like to think I’m human, but I’ve been told in certain situations when the mood is just right and the light is shining perfectly that I actually take the shape of an Eagle with a 25 foot wingspan and glorious plumage. But I can’t speak to the accuracy of those claims.

CaptainZac
1 year ago

Hi Evan!

My question is what airline do you want to fly for (or do fly for) in real life if you had the choice?

Evan L
1 year ago
Reply to  CaptainZac

I am currently still building my hours to the minimum requirements for the airlines, however I am a cadet in recruitment programs for a couple different regional airlines (meaning I’m giving them my hours and they are interested in hiring my once I’m ready), both regionals fly for United which has always been my goal in terms of airlines. As a kid, I had a strong emotional connection to Continental Airlines (shame on United for getting rid of that paint job), and my biggest wish is to stay in the West, based in Denver would be ideal which is a main hub for United. Recently though I have become far more interested in becoming a corporate pilot, either for a company like NetJets, for a corporation, or for a private owner.

Ken
1 year ago

What commercial aircraft do you fly and what airlines do you fly for?

Evan L
1 year ago
Reply to  Ken

Unfortunately haven’t had the chance to fly for any airlines just yet, however a regional airline did invite me out to their headquarters and I got to fly their CRJ-700 full motion simulator that they use for training, which was an awesome experience, and in fact, really not much different than flying a Cessna (except everything happens much faster!)

Finn-14
1 year ago

Hey Evan !
My question is, what’s the most common part of training that student pilots struggle with / fail when learning to fly ? And what can a student do to ensure that they pass that part of the course ?

Evan L
1 year ago
Reply to  Finn-14

Great question! I would say the biggest area students struggle is not one particular subject, but rather the entire aspect of doing ground school. Everyone wants to fly a plane, but only a few of those people realize the amount of work it takes reading and studying on the ground. It requires an in depth knowledge of the rules and regulations, weather theory, how to talk to ATC, and not to mention all of the things that have little to do with flying (how to operate legally if a piece of the plane is broken, knowing how many pounds a gallon of gas weighs, being able to explain why safe maneuvering speed decreases with a decrease in weight, etc.) So really, we are not just pilots, but also lawyers, mechanics, meteorologists, etc. There is a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes for a student pilot. I’m not trying to scare you though, lots of those little pieces of info are some of my favorite parts of flying!

Keegan Dsouza
1 year ago

Hey there Evan, just wanted to ask if can I be a pilot if I am colorblind?

Evan L
1 year ago
Reply to  Keegan Dsouza

So all pilots obtain and hold a medical certificate, which is issued by an aviation medical examiner (AME), basically a normal doctor with some added training, you can find them all over the country) and they will sign you off or send your info the FAA for further review. As pilots, we try to stay healthy but we don’t actually know a ton about what the rules are that those AME’s have to follow. Because of this, it’s hard to say with certainty one way or another without knowing everything. For color blindness specifically, I will say that the odds of you becoming a commercial pilot are very, very low. However, that is not to say that it wouldn’t be possible to get your private license and have a wonderful time flying for fun. I would recommend searching online to find your nearest AME and just having a conversation with them to see what your options are.

Sharan Somayaji
1 year ago

Hey there Evan! Hope you’re doing well:) This thought has been bothering me with weeks. So is it better to get a bachelor’s degree and then apply to the flying school in order to become a pilot? Or is it better if we directly apply to the flying school right after you finish your high school?
Thank you!
Hope you have a wonderful day ahead:)

Evan L
1 year ago

I’m so glad you asked this question, because it’s something that I like sharing my opinion about. In my personal opinion, and based on my experience, I would say that going to college and getting a bachelor’s degree before flight training is absolutely the best way to do it. I will take it a step further and even say that I recommend getting a bachelor’s degree in something you enjoy studying that isn’t aviation related. My degree is in environmental science, which I really enjoyed studying in school and that allowed me to get good grades, and I was fully pursuing it, doing extracurriculars with the full intention of becoming a scientist. And even though I didn’t, I have a great degree to fall back on, and my 4 years in college taught me the study skills I needed to succeed in my accelerated program. If I had started right after high school, I don’t think it would have gone well. And I’m also thankful for the experiences and friends I made in college that I simply wouldn’t have had if I had skipped that chapter in my life.

Sharan Somayaji
1 year ago
Reply to  Evan L

Thank you very much for clearing this doubt for me:)) Now I know what to do! I’m glad that I got a real advice from the flight instructor itself! Thanks a ton!!

Evan L
1 year ago
Reply to  Kyle Boas

Funny enough, as a kid growing up and playing FSX it was always the 767-300, and I couldn’t tell you why I always just loved it. Right now, for a first mainline airline job I would love to fly an Airbus over a Boeing any day, the A320 flight deck is just leagues ahead of the 737. Later on though, the 787 is definitely my favorite widebody. I actually toured the Boeing factory back in 2008 when the first ANA 787 was still sitting on the production line and I got to see it being built, so it would be cool for things to come full circle and I get to fly it at some point.

Alexandre
1 year ago

Hello Evan, what’s up? I’ve got a few questions for you.

1) How much years do you think aviation will nead to get before’s traffic? As for 2019 traffic?

2) What is the funniest airport you’ve ever seen?

3) What would you suggest to a 17YO man who’s like to become pilot during the covid crisis?

Many thanks!

Evan L
1 year ago
Reply to  Alexandre

good questions!

1: That is a good question that nobody knows the answer to. In my personal opinion, without being too pessimistic, I think the recovery will take longer than many people say, and I think there are unforeseen consequences that airlines and others just simply aren’t aware of yet that will become more apparent over time. I know that some airlines have started training new pilots again, but for things to fully return to normal will take at least another full year. And keep in mind, things were not ‘normal’ even before coronavirus with hiring as great as it was, and I don’t think we are ever going to return to that, at least for a long time.

2: This one I may have to think about, it depends what you mean by funny. The airport I did my training out of, KIWA, was funny in that they had 3 massive flight schools, airline traffic, military jet traffic, and a control tower that hosted trainee controllers, which meant every day out there was like the wild west and you never knew what you might see. I also used to fly a lot to KMZJ which is a boneyard airport in Arizona, and I got to watch first them breaking up a bunch of cool planes, and then the Air Canada 737 Max’s showed up for several months, and then with covid watching all the the planes coming in every day until the airport was filled to the brim. That wasn’t so funny, moreso just sad.

3: at 17 years old, if you have the ability to do so, you could get started on your flight training right now. I dont think the pandemic should be a reason to stop training, keep in mind that if you want to be a professional pilot, you want to have your licenses and experience ready by the time this all blows over, not just getting started at that point. Start doing some research on local flight schools, and once you’ve found a couple in your area just walk in and start talking to someone there. As long as you’re gaining knowledge, you’re doing the right thing.