IF Flightplan Tools

November, 5, 2021 by Editors

IF Flight Plan Tools first went live on April 17th 2021 which was Adam’s project he had been working on to learn how to do some coding. With regular updates the website is now more popular than ever with multiple webpages from designing your own flight plan to checking the Live status on the Expert Server!

Many people take advantage of the FPL editor and create approaches that aren’t available in app, for example the NZQN RNP into RWY23:

Whilst others use their creativity to make fun FPLs such as this “Among Us” image:

You can also use the website to get a map of all the 3D airports currently in the sim (as of 21.6):

Away from your device and want a quick update to where you are currently on your FPL or how far you are from your TOD, you can use the “Flight Status” webpage to search for your flight and get a simple breakdown of everything:

Take a look at the official thread of the website here: https://community.infiniteflight.com/t/if-flightplan-tools/555054 for more information or go here to be directed to the website.

If you’ve any suggestions for Adam you can drop him a message in the thread linked above or in private by messaging @AdamCallow on the IFC.

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Eoghan Collins is a writer for the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Officer and a member of the IFATC Testing Team. In the real world, he enjoys spending time on the rugby pitch or with his dog.

VFR Right of Way

November, 2, 2021 by Eoghan Collins

When flying VFR the appropriate separation between other aircraft is 3nm horizontally and 500ft vertically.

Examples of VFR right of way scenarios

  • Converging Courses: You are heading northbound and another aircraft comes from the right and is about to cross your flight path at the same altitude you are at. To handle this, both pilots should turn right immediately to avoid a collision.
  • Head On: Your flying on a heading of 180 at 3000 and another pilot is on a heading of 270 at 3000. As soon as you see each other both of you should turn right to avoid a collision.
  • Overtaking: Your both on the same heading and altitude however the pilot behind is faster and will overtake the pilot at the front. The pilot behind should turn right and overtake the pilot who was ahead before rejoining their flight path.
  • Overtaking on final: There are 2 aircraft on final. The aircraft behind is going faster than the aircraft ahead. Separation will be lost. The aircraft at the lowest altitude has right of way. Most of the time this is the guy in front however not always. The aircraft behind in this case is at 2000ft whilst the aircraft ahead is at 1500ft. The aircraft behind must go around.

General rule: In converging courses or head on scenarios, both pilots should turn right. If one goes left and the other right it wont work out!

Check out this tutorial on the Official Infinite Flight YouTube account for a more visual idea of what was mentioned here:

https://youtu.be/0Jwir5etyXk

Check out the User Guide for more:

https://infiniteflight.com/guide/flying-guide/take-off-to-cruise/visual-flight-rules-(vfr)-en-route-navigation#right-of-way

 

Eoghan Collins is a writer for the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Officer and a member of the IFATC Testing Team. In the real world, he enjoys spending time on the rugby pitch or with his dog.

See and Avoid: What Does This Mean?

October, 28, 2021 by Eoghan Collins

If your flying under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) you navigate visually and “see and avoid” obstacles such as terrain and other aircraft. But what does this mean?

In a short, you are in full control of separation between terrain and other pilots. If you see mountains ahead of you and the MSA in that area is 3000ft and you are cruising at 2500ft then it is up to you to climb to an altitude at or above 3000’ to avoid losing separation with terrain.

The same goes for other pilots, the separation you need to maintain between you and other pilots is 3nm horizontally and 500’ vertically. They will need to give other aircraft the right of way.

Unless stated otherwise, if ATC gives you vectors to de-conflict with IFR traffic, you must follow them until you are told to you can resume your own navigation, you must see and avoid other traffic by maintaining the appropriate separation.

Eoghan Collins is a writer for the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Officer and a member of the IFATC Testing Team. In the real world, he enjoys spending time on the rugby pitch or with his dog.

How To Start Off On The Expert Server As A Controller

October, 4, 2021 by Eoghan Collins

Upon joining the IFATC you will receive a very warm welcome from many people but most importantly you will gain access to controlling on the Expert Server. We will be giving you some advice on how to start off on the Expert Server and what to avoid.

You will firstly be promoted to an ATC Apprentice, this means you can only control Class Charlie and Delta airports.

This is the perfect opportunity to get prepared for controlling bigger and busier airports and also picking up on some skills.

Remember, do not rush. If anything, the best bit of advice that myself and many other controllers can give you is to start small. Although it is indeed tempting to rush into a busy hub once you join, the results can be poor.

Think of it like building a house; in order to build a house you need the foundation first, without a foundation the house will fall apart.

Be open to feedback and criticism. In IFATC, we have a handful of supervisors who have been carefully picked to help maintain order in IFATC and the Expert Server and also to help new and older controllers. A supervisor may swing by one of your sessions and message you a few things. Take this feedback positively, we all make mistakes/do things that can be done in a better way. If it wasn’t for the help from the amazing supervisor team I would not have improved my ATC skills.

Ask questions. If you are not sure of something then ask. We are all here to help!

Finally, a message from Tyler Shelton, the Infinite Flight ATC Manager:

“It’s a marathon, not a race. Take your time in the process and focus on developing a strong ATC foundation. This means being reasonable with your airport selection, picking skillsets to focus on each session, and really putting in the effort to improve without rushing the journey.”

Eoghan Collins is a writer for the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Officer and a member of the IFATC Testing Team. In the real world, he enjoys spending time on the rugby pitch or with his dog.