Over-controlling and under-controlling on Tower

September, 26, 2021 by Kyle Boas

Finding the balance between over-controlling and under-controlling can be tough.

Tower commands like “I’ll call your base”, “Extend downwind”, “Extend upwind”, ect. are commands you can use to control your pattern. Those are the tools at your disposal. When to use them can be unclear though.

The goal is to send the least commands possible, while still being concise and clear. You want your pilots to know what you want from them, take the onus off of them, but only send commands when it is necessary.

Over-control by sending unnecessary superfluous commands that will overcomplicated things, or under-control and let your pattern become a hot mess. It’s can be hard to balance it out. See something, do something.

Be proactive not reactive.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Infinite Flight pilot celebrates 100th landing as part of their therapy recovering from a coma

September, 25, 2021 by Kyle Boas

We wanted to share this inspirational story from an Infinite Flight community member that they bravely shared about how they used the flight simulator as part of their therapy as they recovered from a coma. Here is the post.

You can do more then you think you can and Eric is a testament to that.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Don’t be a missile

September, 23, 2021 by Kyle Boas

At some airports, the airfield elevation isn’t very close at all to sea level. Take MMMX for example, the airfield elevation is 7,316ft MSL.

Violations kick in when you are below 10,000ft MSL, so hypothetically you could fly as fast as the airframe would allow at low altitudes.

Just because you can fly that fast does not mean you should. Flying at cruising speed into an airport and contacting approach is a nightmare for the controller. It’s like vectoring a hoard of missiles.

Note your altitude in AGL relating to the airfield elevation of your destination airport. Don’t exceed unreasonable speeds when contacting approach. Work with them, everyone work together.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

IFATC Education Group Bot issues

September, 22, 2021 by Kyle Boas

I just wanted to put out a quick update for any of those using our Discord bot.

We are aware of an issue with posts not being sent or getting sent multiple times within a short span of time. We are working on a few fixes trying to troubleshoot the problem. We will update you here when we have it all sorted.

If you’d like a more reliable to follow our blog in the meantime, you can recieve our posts in the following places.

If you have any questions about the bot then feel free to send us a message.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Automatic Direction Finder (ADF) Equipment

September, 16, 2021 by Kyle Boas

Automatic direction finding (ADF) is an electronic aid to navigation that identifies the relative bearing of an aircraft from a radio beacon transmitting in the MF or LF bandwidth.

In Infinite Flight it can be used to tune to Non-directional beacons (NDB) and can be found in the NAV/Avionics menu. You’d tune the same way you would tune to a VOR station.

ADF equipment determines the direction or bearing to the NDB station relative to the aircraft by using a combination of directional and non-directional antennae to sense the direction in which the combined signal is strongest.

References: SKYbrary

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

What is wind shear?

September, 13, 2021 by Kyle Boas

Wind shear is a change in wind speed and/or direction over a short distance. It can occur either horizontally or vertically and is most often associated with strong temperature inversions or density gradients. Wind shear can occur at high or low altitude.

Four common sources of low-level wind shear are—

  1. Frontal activity
  2. Thunderstorms
  3. Temperature inversions
  4. Surface obstructions

Wind shear is currently not implemented in Infinite Flight but it has a very big role of course in the real world.

Airplane pilots generally regard significant wind shear to be a horizontal change in airspeed of 30 knots for light aircraft, and near 45 knots for airliners at flight altitude.

References: ”Wind Shear” by the FAA. [PDF]

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

The LA Special Flight Rules Area

September, 12, 2021 by Kyle Boas

If anyone knows me, they’d know I love stuff like this.

Of the 40 designated blocks of Class B airspace in America, only a few approve VFR flyways adjacent to the major airport. VFR flyways offer a more direct path for VFR traffic to navigate through. KLAX is one of them.

The FAA established the LAX Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA) directly above LAX, a VFR corridor with two designated altitudes, 4,500 feet northwest bound and 3,500 feet southeast bound. Visual

In the real world, standard procedure is to announce position and direction on 128.55 MHz, a frequency specific for the flyway, flying at 3,500 feet southeast bound and 4,500 feet northwest bound. The route is further defined by the Santa Monica VOR 312/132-degree radial. Aircraft are instructed to operate with all lights on and to squawk 1201 while in the corridor. To keep traffic reasonably in trail, speed in the corridor is limited to 140 knots.

I discovered this in this awesome video of someone flying the route. It’s very cool.

You could do this procedure in Infinite Flight if you requested a transition, being that transitions would be approved from 2500ft MSL to 5000ft MSL. Also, with the update to the navigation, you can tune to the Santa Monica VOR.

References: Plane & Pilot Magazine

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Question Of The Day, a new daily Discord event

September, 11, 2021 by Kyle Boas

Today we are announcing the addition of a new daily event we are adding to our public Discord to help broaden and test your ATC and flying knowledge so you can apply it to Infinite Flight.

The question of the day will be posted every day at 1700Z. It will quiz you on advanced topics covered in the Infinite Flight User Guide, ATC Manual and from real-world aviation.

So if you are someone who may be struggling with the initial IFATC theory test or just want to learn more about the ATC side of things, this might be something you will be very interested in to enhance your ATC knowledge.

For the pilots who aren’t interested in ATC, questions will be pulled to help broaden your knowledge as we cover more advanced topics that you can apply to your flying in Infinite Flight.

Members within our Discord will have 60 minutes to submit their answer, discuss with other members, and ask questions. Once the 60 minutes are up, at 1800Z the answer will be posted.

Simple concept, should be a ton of fun! The first question will be posted today at 1700Z. If this is something that you would want to be a part of, join our Discord and answer today’s question of the day.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Send expect progressive taxi in the pushback

September, 10, 2021 by Kyle Boas

One thing to note with the new progressive taxi instructions is the fact that you need to send “expect progressive taxi” before you send any progressive taxi instructions.

2.2.2 — Before it’s used, controllers should send ‘Expect Progressive Taxi Instructions’ to the aircraft in question (although this may not always be possible) […]

In order to get ahead of this, a good way to be proactive is by sending the ‘expect progressive taxi” command after telling the aircraft to pushback, if you know you will need to send progressive taxi instructions to that aircraft.

If you were to wait till you needed to send them taxi instructions, you’d need to send potentially in some cases, three commands. ‘Expect progressive taxi’, ‘Taxi to runway X’ and a progressive taxi instruction ‘turn left next taxiway’, for example. By sending it in the pushback you cut those commands down to only two, the taxi instruction ‘taxi to runway x’ and the eventual progressive taxi instructions ‘turn left next taxiway’. This speeds up the process.

Use progressive taxi sparingly, but if it’s needed, be proactive not reactive.

Resources: 2.2.2 of the Infinite Flight ATC Manual

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Whippage

September, 9, 2021 by Kyle Boas

Ever heard of “Bend it like Beckham”? Whippage is a football (soccer) term, used to describe the amount of curve you put on the ball when shooting.

It’s also the word I use to describe this Radar frequency technique, primarily used when clearing aircraft for an ILS/GPS Approach.

It’s required that you clear an aircraft on a heading where they would intercept the localizer on a 10 to 30 degree angle. Nothing more nothing less.

So if you have N632KB on left base for runway 35R, you’d need to clear N623KB on a heading of 360 to 020. If you know the aircraft will be cleared too late though, then you can then whip them around. Instead, you could clear N623KB at heading 320 to 340. Still the required 10 to 30 degree angle.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More