Taxi at a walking pace

July, 7, 2021 by Kyle Boas

A “Safety Alert for Operators” (SAFO 09004) from 2/11/09 says.

Slow the aircraft to a fast walking speed on the centerline of the landing runway prior to attempting to exit the runway. Taxi at a fast walking speed until parked at the ramp or until aligned with the centerline of the runway for takeoff.

Since it’s not clearly defined by the FAA, it’s assumed that most airlines limit taxi speeds via their Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). Also, due to the variety of equipment, it might be unfeasible for the FAA to mandate a specific speed.

Here is a pro tip from Infinite Flight’s User Guide:

Do not exceed 35kts groundspeed to avoid in-game violations, we recommend you keep your speed below 25kts in a straight line and 10kts or less during 90° turns for a safe operation.

References: FAA: Safety Alert for Operations (SAFO) 09004, 2B. Retrieved from the original, Infinite Flight User Guide – Taxi

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

What is a straight out departure?

July, 6, 2021 by Kyle Boas

In Infinite Flight, to simplify things, a straight out departure simply means aircraft should maintain runway heading until no conflict exists. When in doubt, fly straight out.

3.2.8 — When “Straight Out Dept.” is being broadcast in the current ATIS (see 4.2.1 below), the use of “fly runway heading until at or above XXXXft” should be used with every take-off command sent as a final reminder to the departing aircraft; the options available include 1000ft, 3000ft and 5000ft AAL (rounded down to the nearest 500ft). Aircraft climb rates can vary significantly, thus; although aircraft have been instructed to maintain runway heading until a specific altitude, with “Straight Out Dept.” selected in the ATIS, aircraft cannot deviate from runway heading until the departing aircraft is clear of any conflict.

Tower should instruct you to maintain runway heading until you reach a specific altitude, which will be specified in the takeoff clearance. Even if you haven’t received this extra reminder, you should still maintain runway heading until you are clear of any conflicts and depart straight out.

3.2.9 — SIDs often involve turns away from the airport shortly after departure; due to this, if “Straight Out Dept.” is being utilized, Controllers should note that this may prevent pilots from flying the selected SID (see 4.2.1 and 6.4.3 below).

As noted in 6.4.3:

6.4.3 – […] Controllers should let aircraft continue on a SID to the maximum extent possible after departure (therefore vectors and/or altitude assignments are not required on initial contact) unless required for sequencing or traffic avoidance. Due to this, Controllers should limit the use of “Straight Out Dept.” to accommodate SIDs which often involve turns away from the airport shortly after departure (see 3.2.9 and 4.2.1 above).

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Why do controllers change the ATIS letter?

July, 5, 2021 by Kyle Boas

At any time, if the current ATIS (Automatic Terminal Information Service) does not reflect the current situation (including changes in weather), controllers must change the ATIS without delay and relay this to the other controllers involved. The following is the reasons why a controller may change the ATIS phonetic letter:

  • Upon recipient of any new official weather regardless of whether there is or is not a change in valued
  • A runway is removed or added
  • A REMARK or NOTAM is added or removed
  • The addition or removal of new or different frequency instructions
  • If any of the following are changed then the controller would publish a new ATIS with a new phonetic letter, then ensure all pilots and controllers are operating under the same information by broadcasting that a change has been made on all active frequencies.

References: 2-9-2 of FAA Order JO 7110.65Y, 4.1 of the Infinite Flight ATC Manual

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

IFATC Stats: 26 Jun – 2 Jul 2021

July, 4, 2021 by Kyle Boas

The region assignment program allows for new controllers to select one of ten global regions around the world, control any airport within that regional boundary at any time, and remain within their area of operation on a more permanent basis. Read more about the change here.


Awesome work from the following 20 controllers for being the most active out of our entire team in the past 90 days.

Controller Days Active
Edoardo_C 96%
LordWizrak 94%
Alexandre 94%
NJ24 94%
Vignesh_S 94%
Drummer 93%
Kyle0705 93%
Siddhansh 93%
Anthony_Morgan 93%
Neto_Campelo 92%
I_AM_KOREAN_FOX 88%
ShaneAviation 87%
Enrique_Fernandez 86%
JulietTango 84%
Jakub_Astary 82%
Speedbird222 82%
Ramzi_Khairan 80%
CR3W 79%
PilotFabian 77%
Rob_M 77%

If you are interested in becoming an IFATC controller submit an application to get started!


Here is the author leaderboard for this week, this is how many posts you submitted to be published within the week.

Author Posts
Kyle Boas 5
Josh Smithley 1
Suhas 1

Thank you for helping add to the post queue!

Analytics

Here is a comparison between this week and last week website analytics.

Goals

We will be sharing our current follower or membership count and a lofty goal we’d like to reach, so you can watch us grow every week.

If you would like to share your voice with our readers as a contributor or if you’d just like to hangout and see what we do behind the scenes, join our Discord.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Was I denied because I was in a general aviation aircraft?

July, 2, 2021 by Kyle Boas

The controller is responsible for their airspace and they need to be able to accommodate everyone whenever possible.

The reason for denying any aircraft is very situational, it may be difficult to tell why you are denied, so to say you were denied because you are a certain aircraft type is jumping to a conclusion. If you get a “no light aircraft” command sent your way, well then sure. That’s where the education comes in, you have to ask the controller to find out why they sent you a specific instruction. You can on the forum, here is our directory.

It must be specifically reserved for airports that do not accept light aircraft IRL (e.g. EGLL, OMDB, VHHH etc), as 4.2.1 says in the ATC Manual.

My most memorable moments controlling has been fitting in slower performance aircraft in busy airspaces.

We service the pilots they don’t provide a service to us. You just got to work with what you have and fit them in, it’s part of the fun.

References: 7.1.6 of the ATC Manual

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Meeting your trainer halfway

June, 30, 2021 by Kyle Boas

Do the leg work on your end by studying the position you will be training for before training, to the best of your ability. The speed at which you advance is based solely off the knowledge you have going in and your ability to implement new things you learn.

Meet the trainer half way and watch the tutorials, ask questions, practice on your own. Review the following:

Be prepared and make the process smooth. It is so refreshing to meet someone who puts in the effort beforehand. Going in halfway isn’t going to get you far.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Staying calm in high pressure situations

June, 29, 2021 by Kyle Boas

This is a great reminder that it’s always in your best interest to stay calm in high pressure situations. Your body’s fight or flight response will attempt to make you shut down and stop communicating.

Both controlling and flying is all about making split second decisions. Being concise and making up your mind quickly will lower your workload, and allow you to evaluate the situation.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

IFATC Stats: 19-25 Jun 2021

June, 27, 2021 by Kyle Boas

Before we get to the IFATC controller stats, here is the debut of a new addition to the weekly stats post, the week’s IFATC Education Group analytics and goals!

We surpassed 800 published posts last week! Thank you if you’re an OG who read all of them! Here is the author leaderboard for this week, this is how many posts you submitted to be published within the week.

Author Posts
Kyle Boas 2
Sooraj Bishnoi 1
Navy315 1

Thank you all for helping add to the queue! If you are part of the IFATC and would like to share your voice with our readers as a contributor, join our Discord and fill out a ticket.

Analytics

A lot of new viewers this week, welcome to anyone that is new!

Goals

Our social media continues to grow each week! We will be sharing our current follower or membership count and a lofty goal we’d like to reach, so you can watch us grow every week.

Now back to your regular scheduled programming, this information will be shared at the bottom of the weekly stats post every week.


The region assignment program allows for new controllers to select one of ten global regions around the world, control any airport within that regional boundary at any time, and remain within their area of operation on a more permanent basis. Read more about the change here.


Awesome work from the following 20 controllers for being the most active out of our entire team in the past 90 days.

Controller Days Active
Alexandre 96%
Edoardo_C 96%
LordWizrak 94%
NJ24 94%
Neto_Campelo 93%
Drummer 93%
Kyle0705 93%
Siddhansh 93%
Anthony_Morgan 93%
Vignesh_S 93%
Speedbird222 90%
ShaneAviation 89%
Enrique_Fernandez 88%
Ramzi_Khairan 86%
I_AM_KOREAN_FOX 84%
JulietTango 84%
Jakub_Astary 84%
CR3W 79%
Rob_M 78%
xvalespx 78%

If you are interested in becoming an IFATC controller submit an application to get started!

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Repetition every day

June, 23, 2021 by Kyle Boas

Repetition every day. That’s something the great ones do is never get complacent. – Jared Goff

Complacent means that you have become content with yourself or your achievements. You can’t let that happen.

You have to constantly be looking to improve, you can always improve further. The learning process never ends.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Power-On Stall Procedure

June, 22, 2021 by Kyle Boas

Here is a comprehensive video that explains how to perform a power-on stall maneuver. After watching the video, here is a checklist to follow, courtesy of the CFI Notebook:

  1. Select an altitude where recovery will occur no lower than 1500′ AGL
  2. Perform clearing turns
  3. Reduce power adjusting pitch to maintain altitude
    • Trim as necessary
  4. Below VLO, extend the landing gear, as required
    • Callout: “Gear Down”
    • Verify gear DOWN and callout “3 Green, No Red
  5. Below VFE, extend the flaps
  6. Advance the propeller control to full forward (high rpm) as required
  7. Maintain altitude until reaching a normal approach speed and then maintain that speed in a stabilized descent
  8. Descending no lower than 200′, simultaneously reduce power to idle and pitch up to Vy attitude (4-5 degrees, cowling on the horizon)
    • This pitch attitude will be a normal landing attitude
    • Above 5 knots, above stall speed the horn will sound
    • Stall may be performed level or with up to 20° bank angles
  9. At the stall, call out “stalling”
  10. Reduce the AoA to regain control
  11. Add full power
  12. Pitch for Vy
    • Glare shield level with the horizon
  13. Maintain coordination using rudder to prevent spins
  14. With a positive rate of climb established:
    • Begin to raise the flaps in 10° increments
    • Below VLO, and with a positive rate of climb established, call out “positive climb, gear up,” and retract the landing gear
    • Note, some aircraft Pilot Operating Handbooks may require flaps be partially retracted before a positive rate of climb is possible
  15. Complete cruise checklist, returning to the altitude, heading, and airspeed required

Trying a procedure like this can be a fun challenge to give yourself in Infinite Flight. The cool part is that the checklist doesn’t have to be altered. The light aircraft, like the C172, have updated flight physics so you’ll be able to replicate this maneuver right now, on your mobile phone or tablet.

References: CFI Notebook

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More