ATIS winds are magnetic

November, 8, 2021 by Kyle Boas

If you read it, it’s true. If you hear it, it’s magnetic.

All charts and textual sources such as the METAR, TAF, winds aloft, surface analysis charts, etc. use true north as the reference.

ATIS broadcasts, or any information a controller gives you over the radio, is magnetic. From the AIM, “Wind direction broadcast over FAA radios is in reference to magnetic north.”

References:
1. AIM Section 7-1-11 page 7-1-26 in the 5/26/16 edition.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Duck!

November, 7, 2021 by Kyle Boas

You know the common phrase one yells when they see something flying towards someone else, “Duck!”, which lets the other person know they need to move under something or to avoid being hit by whatever is coming there way.

Your friend, let’s call him Bob, sees that you are about to get pelted with a ball. Bob yells “Duck!”, you move and the ball avoids hitting you. Thank? you, Bob.

So you’re flying, under the control of approach maintaining an assigned of 11,000ft. There’s a mountain peak directly ahead at 11,500ft, 7nm, 6nm, Bob your co-pilot sees the aircraft and alerts you to move, 5nm away now. Do you, A, immediately move out of the way of the mountain then request an altitude change or, B, request an altitude change and maintain heading and altitude.

Common sense says, Duck, move out the way, Bob knows what he’s talking about. You wouldn’t fly your 135 passengers into the hill, you’d move. Bob wouldn’t need clearance to warn you about the ball that’s about to whack you in the dome either, he just yells “Duck!” and you move.

You don’t need clearance from approach to move when an immediate terrain conflict exists. Check your surroundings and avoid the conflict, request an altitude change, live another day.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Should you clear someone for a touch and go when it’s busy

November, 6, 2021 by Kyle Boas

When the airport is crowded and you’re not accepting pattern work, the natural reaction would be to not allow people to do a touch and go. But you should.

Calling inbound for touch and goes does not mean they will be remaining in the pattern, they may simply just coming then going.

I got asked today if the person who was planning on doing a flight of X into a possibly busy airport, if they needed special permission or coordination with the controllers to do a low pass of the runway.

Unfortunately, I probably will need to let the controllers know beforehand that that is allowed.

“Cleared for the option” means that how the pilot’s approach terminates is at their own discretion. This means the pilot can do a touch-and-go, a stop-and-go, a full-stop landing, a low approach, or a missed approach. Just because pattern work is not allowed does not mean they can’t be cleared for the option then leave the airspace after their approach.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Calm your storm

November, 3, 2021 by Kyle Boas

“You can’t calm the storm, so stop trying. What you can do is calm yourself. The storm will pass.” – Timber Hawkeye

You can only control you so if you’re overwhelmed by traffic volume, calm yourself and execute.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Poor posture

October, 30, 2021 by Kyle Boas

If I have poor posture at home but good posture in public, why?

Why not perform to your best and follow procedures when someone is not looking the same way you would if someone was looking.

Bad habits like over-controlling, excessive instructions, etc. are all just that, bad habits. Just because no one is looking does not mean that you can perform subpar.

Quality service is not traffic dependent.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

No pattern work and radar patterns

October, 27, 2021 by Kyle Boas

If pattern work is denied by Tower, can you still received radar patterns from Approach? Yes, here is why.

3.6.2 — Pattern work must stay with Tower, and must not be handed over to the Radar Controller unless it has been decided to deny pattern work; in which case, those aircraft that are in the pattern can be converted into a radar pattern by handing them over to the Radar Controller.

The intent is for this to apply to local tower patterns only. When it gets to a point where tower patterns are denied it’s because radar is solely responsible for setting the arrival sequence. Tower would still have a say in the metering to get departures out, but ultimately radar is setting it all up while tower simply clears them to land.

If tower patterns prevent an efficient flow they can be denied and left for radar to determine, whether to stay in the box pattern or be told to divert to another airport.

“No pattern work” in ATIS doesn’t have to be an all or nothing. So it’s both the Tower and Approach controllers discretion whether or not they would allow tower patterns or radar patterns.

It is common in the real-world for pilots to ask to perform radar patterns while having Radar sequence arrivals.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

We are learning with you

October, 25, 2021 by Kyle Boas

I tell this to all Writers we bring on to the team.

The goal of the blog is to share new things you learn, we are not experts in every subject we talk about.

Those who write for this blog in any role, including me, must have the mindset that they are learning something new then and sharing what they learned.

You have to have that kind of mindset period, you can be wrong. There are new ways of doing things that you aren’t aware of. Maybe something got lost in translation and you are incorrect. That’s okay, part of the process.

We are not above the reader, it’s an equal playing field and we learn together.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Set your team’s goal

October, 19, 2021 by Kyle Boas

“The pessimist complains about the wind. The optimist expects it to change. The leader adjusts the sails.” – John Maxwell

Do not wait for others to start the change or work towards a goal, lead the team to the goal you set. That goes in any team, whether that be as a pilot or controller.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

ATC Schedule has returned

October, 18, 2021 by Kyle Boas

This month’s Infinite Flight ATC schedule has been released! Check it out here.

An ATC schedule will be posted on the forum once per month which will feature 3-5 airports per day. IFATC members can control *anywhere* in the world at anytime with the exception of Friday’s during Friday Night Flight, one of Infinite Flight’s most popular recurring weekly event.

IFATC will be highly encouraged to keep featured airports from the schedule fully staffed since it offers pilots more predictability, however they will have the freedom to open what we’d like, whether it’s staffing a community event or something random.

To learn more about the newest evolution of the ATC’s staffing on Infinite Flight, read this blog post.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More

Don’t on-guard aircraft tuned into active frequencies

October, 17, 2021 by Kyle Boas

There is no normal scenario in which a controller is allowed to on guard an aircraft that is tuned in to another active frequency.

> [5.2.2](https://infiniteflight.com/guide/atc-manual/5.-airspace/5.2-on-guard-procedures#5.2.2) — Aircraft should be given a reasonable amount of time to tune into the frequency after being “on guarded”, in addition aircraft must not be ‘on guarded’ if on another active frequency.

Think about from the pilot’s perspective. Handoff to Tower then cleared to land. They’re on final, getting ready to land, then they get the on guard warning.

“N623KB you’re in an active airspace, please contact Philadelphia Approach on 126.6“

Panic time. As the pilot, should I stay with Tower? Should I switch to Approach on my own without asking for a frequency change? Should I request a frequency change from Tower? Am I going to get reported if I stay with Tower? The answer to that last question is no, you would not be reported.

If you’re the pilot in this scenario you’d ignore the on guard and continue to follow all instructions.

IFATC controllers on the expert server have the ability to message each other on Discord, while controlling. They’ll chat in a voice or text channel back and forth during the session to coordinate. All they have to do is ask the other controller.

You’d ignore because one, controllers can’t on guard aircraft on other active frequencies, and two, it could have been a mistake.

Two double taps on an aircraft with misplaced fat finger, a controller can accidentally on guard a pilot. This can happen, I have done it a few times.

The only unusual scenario where you could on guard is if the pilot switches from your frequency on their own. As the pilot, it’s crucial that you don’t switch frequencies on your own. Always ask for a frequency change when it’s appropriate.

Kyle Boas is the Founder of the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Supervisor and Infinite Flight Appeals team member. — More