New Education Group Weekly Objectives

June, 23, 2022 by

The IFATC Education Group weekly  objectives will allow new or experienced pilots to train their overall ability of flying.

This will consist of a weekly objective that you can try to achieve in order to win some perks. Some of these objectives may be:

  1. Land with 50FPM or lower at a given airport.

  2. Take off in high wind at a given airport.

  3. Do XX patterns in a difficult aircraft.

And many more!

Some of the perks may be:

Extra experience in the IFATC Education Group Server Roles.

A special Instagram Post.

If you are interested, stay tuned for an announcement coming in the server soon!

Matei G. is a writer for the IFATC Education Grouo. He is in multiple VAs, he’s an aviation passionate, he likes helping people out in the whole Infinite Flight Community. He’s grade 3, soon to be 4. He has a lot of things to talk about and likes pancakes!

Session preparing

March, 17, 2022 by

“The best preparation for tomorrow is doing your best today.” – H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

Do your best at your training session, and you’ll see yourself doing better at the next one! Never forget to make a plan!

Matei G. is a writer for the IFATC Education Grouo. He is in multiple VAs, he’s an aviation passionate, he likes helping people out in the whole Infinite Flight Community. He’s grade 3, soon to be 4. He has a lot of things to talk about and likes pancakes!

Keeping the downwind

March, 10, 2022 by

One thing my trainer, Alexandre, always told me to do that helped me a ton during my radar training, is putting everyone on the same downwind, which in most cases would be the safest downwind out of them all.

This will help a lot with organising your airspace and with not also having to think about when to turn them so they don’t make a conflict. This technique is mainly used at a one runway airport.

However, for a parallel runway airport, I suggest using one downwind for only Radar Vectors, Visual approach, and the other one mainly for GPS and ILS approach to help organizing things as well.

Matei G. is a writer for the IFATC Education Grouo. He is in multiple VAs, he’s an aviation passionate, he likes helping people out in the whole Infinite Flight Community. He’s grade 3, soon to be 4. He has a lot of things to talk about and likes pancakes!

Loosing control

March, 3, 2022 by

Do you ever lose control in an IFATC session? Where one plane is busting separation with another one. Your plan is falling apart.

Here is a little tip whenever this happens, stop controlling for a few seconds, take a deep breath, ignore the commands in the background.

Think of a plan that will rapidly help you manage all this chaos. Work from the inside out. Start organising one plane, then slowly move to the other one.

Remember, it is normal to lose control and it happens to everyone!

Matei G. is a writer for the IFATC Education Grouo. He is in multiple VAs, he’s an aviation passionate, he likes helping people out in the whole Infinite Flight Community. He’s grade 3, soon to be 4. He has a lot of things to talk about and likes pancakes!

Question and Answer with Matei

March, 1, 2022 by

One of the perks of being a writer for the group is that after 3 months of creating posts, you get to have your very own Q&A, so here is mine. Our Discord members got to ask me questions, here are my answers.

What do you plan on writing about in IFATC Education Group?

I plan to write about anything really, from tips to join IFATC, to tips to progress in IFATC, to facts in the real-world aviation.

What are some hobbies of yours outside of Infinite Flight?

I like eating pancakes a lot, also, I just found a hobby which is web development, still in the learning phase, let’s wait and see what I can achieve.

What is your favorite part about Infinite Flight?

The best part of IF in my opinion is this huge community. I have never seen a community this big in any other flight simulators. Amazing what this app has achieved.

What is your favorite aircraft and route?

My favorite aircraft by far is either the A330 or the A220. One is good at landings, the other looks awesome. I don’t have a favorite route, but my favorite destination has to be Kai Tak. Sad it’s closed.

Which airport do you enjoy controlling the most?

I think that’s gonna be Princess Juliana. Such a beautiful airport.

When flying, which of the following approach types do you prefer the most the ILS, GPS, VIS?

That’s gonna be GPS for me because I can stay and do nothing until the very end at 2 miles final.

What is your biggest inspiration within Infinite Flight?

I think the thing that inspires me the most in this community is the virtual airlines. It’s a great way to captivate users and create a system where there would be a purpose in flying. Trying to get on top of the ranks.

Congratulations on your recent promotion to Officer! How has your IFATC experience been so far and what would you say to anyone interested in joining?

My experience overall in IFATC has been awesome, met so many great people, as I said, the community is amazing. Also, this is the best ATC simulation I have ever tried.

For those trying to join I would say that even if they fail multiple times, to not give up whatsoever, even if that is 2 times or 10 times, just keep going and you’ll get there eventually. Also, this can’t be said enough, start small, don’t go to big airports directly!

Thank you all for the questions, really glad to be working with this community and can’t wait to see what it can achieve in the future!

Matei G. is a writer for the IFATC Education Grouo. He is in multiple VAs, he’s an aviation passionate, he likes helping people out in the whole Infinite Flight Community. He’s grade 3, soon to be 4. He has a lot of things to talk about and likes pancakes!

Feedback inbound!

February, 4, 2022 by

“Learning to receive feedback from each other is what leadership is all about”.

-Sheila Heen 

Stop feeling down when there’s a feedback your way, make that your key to success!

Matei G. is a writer for the IFATC Education Grouo. He is in multiple VAs, he’s an aviation passionate, he likes helping people out in the whole Infinite Flight Community. He’s grade 3, soon to be 4. He has a lot of things to talk about and likes pancakes!

Immediate take-off command

February, 3, 2022 by

The “cleared for immediate take off” command, otherwise known as “Go, Go, Go!” is used when there is a lot of traffic around the specific airport and the controller needs you to take off as soon as possible.

If you are holding short and you hear your callsign and that command in the same sentence, you need to react to it very rapidly. You should increase power, get on the runway, and begin rolling without a stop right before it.

If you are lined up and you hear this command, then you should begin the take off without any delay whatsoever.

It’s mandatory that pilots know this, it helps ATC manage traffic more easily and it improves the traffic flow of the airspace.

Matei G. is a writer for the IFATC Education Grouo. He is in multiple VAs, he’s an aviation passionate, he likes helping people out in the whole Infinite Flight Community. He’s grade 3, soon to be 4. He has a lot of things to talk about and likes pancakes!

What are those yellow thingies at the end of the runway?

February, 2, 2022 by

When taking off or when buttering on the runway, you may have noticed those different types of thresholds and the very end or beginning of the runway.

The first one is a “Pre threshold Area” which is not meant for aircraft movement. That means that you cannot stop on this part of the runway, taxi or take off.

The second threshold is also a “Pre threshold area” that is fit for aircraft movement as a stop way only. That means that you are able to line up and wait on this part of the runway, but not take off or taxi on it.

The third one is a “Permanently Displaced Threshold” fit for aircraft movement. This part reduces the stopping distance of the runway. But can be used for taxiing, or taking off.

And the last one is a “Temporarily Displaced Threshold” For 6 months or less. It has the same usage as the third threshold. But it’s going to stay there for less than 6 months.

Source: https://instagram.com/aviationfile?utm_medium=copy_link

Matei G. is a writer for the IFATC Education Grouo. He is in multiple VAs, he’s an aviation passionate, he likes helping people out in the whole Infinite Flight Community. He’s grade 3, soon to be 4. He has a lot of things to talk about and likes pancakes!

“Bend it like Beckham”, with a twist missed.

January, 31, 2022 by

We once wrote about a whippage technique where it is too late for a radar controller to give an aircraft that is on base waiting for an ILS clearance. You would have to do a reverse curve and clear them for the ILS with a 10° to 30° Angle.

The missed ILS clearance is a little different. Let’s say that you have given the ILS clearance at a 30° angle but the pilot has missed the Glide slope or/and localiser. In that case, you would have to do similar thing as the “whippage” technique, but now, you can just give the heading and the clearance directly. But remember to give a lower intercept altitude for the pilot to be able to intercept de glide slope.

Here’s an example, you gave a clearance for runway 26L with a 290° Intercept at 3000ft. The pilot has missed the glideslope and/or Localiser. You give another clearance with an intercept at 230° at 2000’ for it to be able to intercept the glide slope properly without being too high because he is closer to the runway.

Matei G. is a writer for the IFATC Education Grouo. He is in multiple VAs, he’s an aviation passionate, he likes helping people out in the whole Infinite Flight Community. He’s grade 3, soon to be 4. He has a lot of things to talk about and likes pancakes!

Don’t leave your device too early

January, 23, 2022 by

Doing overnight flights or leaving your device unsupervised is never easy. Some unfortunate pilots, if they have not set up their plane correctly, can unfortunately loose control over the aircraft once they’re no longer at their device.

Don’t leave your device right after passing 10,000 feet. At higher altitudes, there is a lower density of wind, which means that the aircraft’s engines need more power. And if this kind of power isn’t supported by the respective engines, you could stall out before even realizing it.

This is why I’d recommend you supervise your device until reaching your cruising altitude. When you think that everything is perfect and no risks could potentially happen. You can leave your device unattended.

Matei G. is a writer for the IFATC Education Grouo. He is in multiple VAs, he’s an aviation passionate, he likes helping people out in the whole Infinite Flight Community. He’s grade 3, soon to be 4. He has a lot of things to talk about and likes pancakes!