True Airspeed versus Indicated Airspeed

June, 9, 2021 by Ruan M.

To start off we first need to know what is True Airspeed? Well, it is pretty simple it is the airspeed that your aircraft is moving through air. Now that we know that we can move onto the next portion.

Why are they different? Well the aircraft speed indicator measures pressure not speed. Your airspeed indicator will read very accurate at sea level with perfect conditions but if you add weather along with the aircraft climbing it starts reading inaccurate speeds. That is because the airspeed indicator shows a slower speed due to density increasing based on the altitude and air changes. That is the reason why you cannot directly measure true airspeed.

Now that we know why we can’t accurately measure true airspeed we need to know why does it matter? Well put simple if you use indicated airspeed to calculate fuel burn, time to destination etc you will be way off and that is why true airspeed is so important. Did you know that cruise performance charts use True Airspeed?

6-14-3 — As the altitude of aircraft increases, so will the difference between IAS and GS. Below are some very “ball-park” figures which can be used for reference. With the aircraft flying at

– 250kts IAS with no wind
– 3000ft ~ 260kts GS (+10)
– 6000ft ~ 270kts GS (+20)
– 9000ft ~ 290kts GS (+40)
– 12000ft ~ 300kts GS (+50)

There we can see a increase in speed from the set 250 knots True Airspeed as we climb through altitudes.

Refrences: BoldMethod

Ruan M. is a contributor for the IFATC Education Group. He is 15 year old avid Infinite flight simmer and Air Traffic Controller who has been part of Infinite Flight since 2015. He currently resides in South Africa with a second home in the Kingdom of Bahrain. He is an IFATC specialist applying for radar training.

Welcoming 11 new IFATC Supervisors

June, 8, 2021 by Tyler Shelton

I’m extremely happy to welcome our newest IFATC Supervisors to the team!

  • Jakub Astary
  • Eddie (Edoardo_C)
  • Alexandre
  • LesterXavier
  • Antoine Turrian
  • DannyL
  • Kyle (Kyle0705)
  • Siddhansh Narang
  • Vignesh S
  • Zuhair.Mazhar
  • Evan V.

Each of these members have stood out in their day to day controlling, training time contributions, training roles, appeal team efforts, and continue to perfectly represent the expectations outlined in 1A.5.3!

As we move forward and grow in size you’ll see another round of Appeal Team members, new Supervisors, and a Tester team refresh in an effort to pass around opportunities for others to get involved.

Tyler Shelton is the ATC Community Manager for Infinite Flight. He is also a real-world civilian air traffic controller with the FAA assigned to Harrisburg International Airport [KMDT].

What is Gliding? Part 3: Approach/Landing

June, 7, 2021 by Suhas J.

When a glider pilot decides to return to their respective airfield for landing, they have to monitor altitude and airspeed very closely. There are no second chances.

Firstly, a typical landing begins with a 45 degree entry into a downwind pattern leg, and then continuing with a base and final leg. It is essential for a pilot to have a reference point to refer to for relative altitude or location, and that a set base turn point is established prior to turning base. A good rule of thumb in gliders is that being too high is better than being too low. Glider pilots fly a high approach, using the dive brakes, flaps, or side slips for speed control. A good airspeed to stay at during approach is a speed that is 1.5x more than the stall speed of the glider. A glider pilot should monitor airspeed and control airspeed with usage of dive brakes, along with keeping a close eye on altitude and set pattern legs. If the approach is set up correctly, the landing will be smooth and efficient.

Want to try this in Infinite Flight? Fly a non-powered approach in any General Aviation aircraft. Be sure to try this in an uncontrolled environment in case something should go wrong. Start higher than usual, only use power when necessary, and keep the aircraft’s speed around 1.5x higher than the stall speed. Join the downwind leg at a 45 degree angle and use flight spoilers or flaps for speed control. Avoid a go around and try your best to nail the approach and landing. Experiment with different aircraft and variables, including weather. Get creative and challenge yourself!

Suhas is a writer for the IFATC Education Group. He is a long time Infinite Flight user and IFATC Specialist. In the real world, he’s a student pilot on both glider and powered aircraft. He's also an IFVARB Board Member.

IFATC Stats: 29 May – 4 Jun 2021

June, 6, 2021 by Tyler Shelton

The region assignment program allows for new controllers to select one of ten global regions around the world, control any airport within that regional boundary at any time, and remain within their area of operation on a more permanent basis. Read more about the change here.


Awesome work from the following 20 controllers for being the most active out of our entire team in the past 90 days.

Controller Days Active
Alexandre 91%
Edoardo_C 91%
Drummer 90%
NJ24 90%
Kyle0705 90%
Siddhansh 90%
Vignesh_S 90%
LordWizrak 90%
Anthony_Morgan 89%
Speedbird222 89%
Neto_Campelo 88%
ShaneAviation 86%
Enrique_Fernandez 84%
Ramzi_Khairan 84%
Jakub_Astary 83%
xvalespx 83%
JulietTango 81%
Zachary_Naponic 78%
Kedz 77%
Rob_M 74%

If you are interested in becoming an IFATC controller submit an application to get started!

Tyler Shelton is the ATC Community Manager for Infinite Flight. He is also a real-world civilian air traffic controller with the FAA assigned to Harrisburg International Airport [KMDT].

IFATCLive new Twitch streaming group

June, 5, 2021 by Matt A.

IFATCLive is a streaming group I started with the goal of creating an outlet for the community to observe and learn from the best controllers IFATC has to offer. On a daily basis, one of our eleven controllers, featuring three supervisors and eight officers representing five ATC regions,
stream their sessions to the account. The streams are simple, and for good reason. We want to provide the community with insight into our controlling, and nothing else.

Our team is constantly expanding, and if you are interested in joining, we would certainly love to
have you. Since the group is invitation-only, there is no application process, but please feel free to send me a message expressing your interest. However, when new controllers are selected, we
prioritize seniority and experience within IFATC, previous streaming experience, as well as various other factors.

If you’d like to watch a stream for yourself, come check out our [channel](https://www.twitch.tv/
ifatclive) on Twitch, and give as a follow while you’re at it. You can also find more information on our [forum thread](https://community.infiniteflight.com/t/ifatclive-controlling-sessions-live-on-
twitch/571831), where you can find a list of our controllers, as well as stream schedules and updates. We’re just getting started, but there’s plenty in store that we’re extremely excited to
share with the community and beyond.

Matt T. is a contributor for the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC Officer that resides in Orange County, California.

Decision Altitude (DA)

June, 4, 2021 by Ruan M.

The Decision Altitude (DA) is a specified altitude in the Precision Approach or approach with vertical guidance at which a Missed Approach must be initiated if the required visual reference to continue the approach has not been established.

This would only be used with ILS and LNAV/VNAV approaches.

At the DA altitude a pilot must state whether they want to continue with the landing and land or go around and try again.

There are many reasons for a go around at DA.

  • The pilot could be too high above glide
  • Too low below glide
  • To fast
  • To slow

You must also only make your decision whilst still on glide, you can not dive low and then make it or fly up and make it. Your decision needs to be final and done at that point to continue the flight safely.

References: SKYbrary, BoldMethod

Ruan M. is a contributor for the IFATC Education Group. He is 15 year old avid Infinite flight simmer and Air Traffic Controller who has been part of Infinite Flight since 2015. He currently resides in South Africa with a second home in the Kingdom of Bahrain. He is an IFATC specialist applying for radar training.

Minimum Descent Altitude

June, 3, 2021 by Ruan M.

Minimum Descent Altitude (MDA) is a specified altitude or height in a 2D instrument approach operation or circling approach operation below which descent must not be made without the required visual reference.

A pilot can not go any lower than MDA until they see the runway. If they do not spot the runway then they will then execute a missed approach to the missed approach point (MAP).

Once you see the runway and confirmed everything you may continue your descent and land safely, if not you fly to the MAP and execute a missed approach and re-try the approach. Sometimes with very low visibility you will have to fly quite close to the runway in order to spot it and continue safely.

References: BoldMethod

Ruan M. is a contributor for the IFATC Education Group. He is 15 year old avid Infinite flight simmer and Air Traffic Controller who has been part of Infinite Flight since 2015. He currently resides in South Africa with a second home in the Kingdom of Bahrain. He is an IFATC specialist applying for radar training.

Baptiste’s ATC Journey Part 2: Recruitment

June, 2, 2021 by Baptiste Desmet

April 24, 2021, I started the IFATC recruitment process. I met all the necessary requirements to be able to do it and I went for it. 5 hours later I have an answer from my recruiter assigned, ShaneAviation telling me that I can do my theory test. I passed the test the same evening with 84%. I was delighted I passed this step and I am now redirected to the practical. I made the decision not to take it right away and to take some training with a trainer before attempting the test.

April 27, 2021, I received a message from my assigned trainer, Juan Oosthuizen who is also a supervisor, that he would be my trainer. I booked the different sessions that I had to have and I officially started my training on the 29th of April, 2021.

My first session was not the best I had a lot of mistakes but I didn’t give up and we did the session again another day and it was better. Then followed about 6 sessions in which I learned a lot of things. Finally, on May 16, 2021 I did my last session with Juan and this session covered everything I needed in a practical, which I passed and so after this one I booked with my recruiter to attempt the practical test the same day and I passed the test successfully.

I was a little stressed at the beginning but in the end everything went well because I knew I was capable of it. For this part of my journey I would like to personally thank Juan Oosthuizen for the time they have taken for me and for all they have taught me!

May 16, 2021, I officially became part of the IFATC team, after the written, 6 sessions and my practical, what an adventure. I am very happy to be doing ATC every day throughout Europe, I was promoted to IFATC Specialist on May 23, 2021 after passing my chech-ride phase. Now, since I became a specialist I have given myself the goal to open different airports every day and not to focus on big HUBs right away but that will come I’m sure very soon!

Baptiste Desmet is a contributor for the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC specialist and he really likes flying and controlling.

Baptiste’s ATC Journey Part 1: The Beginning

June, 1, 2021 by Baptiste Desmet

When I started playing Infinite Flight it was back when there was still the Space Shuttle, the Super Decathlon and global was yet to be released. I took a half a year break before finally coming back to Infinite Flight when global was released. I clearly re-discovered what Infinite Flight was, everything or at least a good part of it had changed.

We had the whole world map, you no longer had to pay for each plane, instead you would need to pay a subscription, and that’s what made me come back to Infinite Flight.

At first I was doing small flights between LAX and SFO, and I thought I would never do long haul flights or ATC. Those are the two things I did a little later (2-3 months after I told myself that). Then came the confinement because of COVID-19, we were forced to stay at home, that’s when I started to get into Infinite Flight, I didn’t stop anymore. I did a lot of group flights, events and everything and one day I got the idea to start ATC.

My beginnings as an ATC were not glorious, I was only controlling in London (when there was room) but when I was connected to London it was a disaster, no one listened to the commands I gave them, everyone did the opposite of what I said and unfortunately, in a training server there is no way to stop an aircraft/pilot from doing what they are doing other than to tell them to follow instructions (which of course they don’t do). After that I started to be a bit disgusted because I found it so sad and so it didn’t make me want to open again as an ATC.

Finally, I started to do ATC again but trying to diversify the airports, I started by opening my home airport EBBR but nobody came, too much forgotten unfortunately in the square CDG, AMS, FRA and LHR. Then I opened Amsterdam, Paris, Frankfurt, Berlin, Toulouse, cities of this type and I had a lot more traffic and from that moment I took a taste of ATC but did not have enough time to dedicate to training.

A few months later, at the end of April 2021, I decided to start getting serious and begin the recruitment process to become part of the IFATC.

Baptiste Desmet is a contributor for the IFATC Education Group. He is an IFATC specialist and he really likes flying and controlling.

Utilizing ATC Region Tracking Topics

May, 31, 2021 by Muhammad A.

With the new ATC regions in effect, controllers need a new way to communicate with pilots about airport openings, times open, etc. This is where the new ATC Region Tracking Topics come in.

These topics are designed to engage controllers and pilots in several ways, and in several perspectives.

ATC Perspective
Air Traffic Controllers can comment on the topic, announcing the opening of an ATC facility, along with important airport information. Announcing opening of a facility in these topics will increase exposure to the pilots willing to fly to ATC serviced, potentially leading to more traffic.

Pilots’ Perspective
When available, you can check the #atc category on the Infinite Flight Community Forum and locate a region’s ATC Tracking Topic to find the current staffed airports. You can also check the latest events on the first post of the topic. Using the ATC Region Tracking Topic, your next flight will most likely include ATC staffing.

Event Creators’ Perspective
There is also a third point-of-view regarding these topics; event creators. As mentioned above, the latest events of a region will be featured in the original post. This increases exposure to events, potentially boosting sign-ups, and everyone will therefore have a better experience.

Using ATC Region Tracking Topics will bring nothing but positive results to all sides and perspectives. It’s a win-win-win scenario. So why not use it to announce staffing of an airport, create an event, or even plan your next flight?

Muhammad A. is a contributor for the IFATC Education Group and an IFATC Specialist. He is also the founder of LOT Virtual, and enjoys basic coding in his free time.